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A Happy Office With Thalma Lobel and Ed Fulbright on Mastering Your Money Radio

We all want to perform at our best and be successful, creative, and happy at work. Yet these days, with the COVID-19 pandemic, work is a major source of stress. People are worried not only about getting sick, but also about the impact on their business, career, and future. Many people have lost their job or fear they will. In addition to concerns about job security, people have to adjust to new work environments and working from home. Workers at all levels in wide-ranging fields are seeking advice to help them deal with this unprecedented, stressful situation. What can we do to become more effective and feel more fulfilled at work as a matter of course, but especially as the COVID-19 crisis lingers? Many experts focus on obvious factors, such as motivation and networking. Yet, few recognize or understand the more subtle environmental prompts and everyday habits that have a significant impact on our work. Things we typically overlook—from workspace fixtures, such as lighting, to commonplace gestures—can have a big influence on performance and well-being at work Joining us for our discussion on A Happy Office is Thalma Lobel who is on the phone from her Tel Aviv office. Thalma E. Lobel is an internationally recognized psychologist and expert on human behavior. A former chair at the School of Psychological Sciences at Tel Aviv University and director of the Adler Center for Child Development and Psychotherapy, she has been a visiting professor at Harvard University and a visiting scholar at Tufts University, the University of California at San Diego, and New York University. Her previous book, Sensation: The New Science of Physical Intelligence, was published in 15 countries. Lobel is a sought after speaker who regularly keynotes events in top research institutions and corporations around the world. Her new book is Whatever Works: The Small Cues That Make a Surprising Difference in Our Success at Work—and How to Create a Happier Office Welcome to Mastering Your Money, Thalma Lobel .

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The Amazon Effect with Brian Dumaine and Ed Fulbright on Mastering Your Money Radio

Before the coronavirus epidemic, Amazon had been consuming some 2% of all U.S. household income, a percentage that has assuredly risen since the outbreak’s onset, particularly among the company’s more than 150+ million Amazon Prime members. While 51% of American households attend church, 62% have Prime memberships. In the best of times, the company’s presence in our daily lives is inescapable. As Amazon gains many invaluable lessons from the Covid-19 outbreak, the company will only become more ubiquitous in the decades ahead. Soberly aware of Amazon’s staying power, the CEO quipped to employees in 2018: “I predict one day, Amazon will fail. If you look at large companies, their lifespans tend to be thirty-plus years.” At the time he made that comment, Amazon was twenty-four-years-old. Bestselling Good to Great author Jim Collins says Amazon needs to build a new mechanism for growth. That mechanism—a virtuous cycle “flywheel” that used data to attract more buyers and sellers whose new data contributions could then be harnessed by the flywheel—was championed by Bezos and today has been made to accelerate even faster using Amazon’s massive AI engines. As the author argues, Amazon is a business where AI is increasingly making the decisions that humans used to make and keeps getting smarter on its own. Rivals have taken notice. This why some companies, such as Walmart and Alibaba, have chosen to steal from Amazon’s playbook while others have tried to identify the few things the Seattle juggernaut can’t do and excel at them. Bezos has built one of the most efficient wealth-creation machines in history, a juggernaut. This convenience, however, will come at a cost. It will lead to massive job disruptions and our lives being affected by technology in ever more invasive ways. Joining us for our discussion on The Amazon Effect is Brian Dumaine who is on the phone from his New York office. Brian Dumaine is an award-winning journalist and a contributing editor at Fortune magazine. His latest book is Bezonomics: How Amazon is Changing our Lives and What The World's Best Companies Are Learning From It. Welcome to Mastering Your Money, Brian Dumaine .

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Career Intelligence Quotient With Kwame Salter and Ed Fulbright on Mastering Your Money Radio

Unless you’ve given up on your career or feel that you have plateaued, the idea of getting promoted remains a driving force behind your day-to-day performance. Conventional wisdom and some empirical data suggest that the first ninety days in a new job are critical in determining if you are going to experience a ‘hard or soft landing’. One arrives at a new place without the benefit of what I call ‘relationship equity’. Relationship equity is the value that comes from knowing and working with others. The problem is that ‘relationship equity’ does not transfer to your next company–you earn it. Again, per research, you have 90 days to start building this type of equity with your new colleagues. In addition to building relationship equity, figuring out how to efficiently transition from the old job to the new one is critical. Regardless of whether the promotion is internal or to another company, the crucial question is “Whose job are you working on?” Unless you’ve given up on your career or feel that you have plateaued, the idea of getting promoted remains a driving force behind your day-to-day performance. Conventional wisdom and some empirical data suggest that the first ninety days in a new job are critical in determining if you are going to experience a ‘hard or soft landing’. One arrives at a new place without the benefit of what I call ‘relationship equity’. Relationship equity is the value that comes from knowing and working with others. The problem is that ‘relationship equity’ does not transfer to your next company–you earn it. Again, per research, you have 90 days to start building this type of equity with your new colleagues. In addition to building relationship equity, figuring out how to efficiently transition from the old job to the new one is critical. Regardless of whether the promotion is internal or to another company, the crucial question is “Whose job are you working on?”

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Sudden Career Change with Dr Jarret Patton and Ed Fulbright On Mastering Your Money Radio

What do you do when your life takes an unexpected turn for the worse? Where can you turn when everything you have worked for comes crashing down and your title no longer serves as your identity? You find your reputation that you have built over a couple decades being damage by false accusations by the legal and licensing systems. Joining us for our discussion Sudden Career Change is Dr. Jarret R. Patton who is calling in from his PA office. Jarret R. Patton better known as Dr. Jarret. He is a pediatrician with nearly 20 years of experience, spent his clinical career taking care of children in an urban clinic and his administrative career as a top physician executive in eastern Pennsylvania.

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Learning From Others With Joseph Michelli and Ed Fulbright On Mastering Your Money Radio

“With backgrounds in design thinking and software engineering, the founders of Airbnb (Brian Chesky, Joe Gebbia, and Nathan Blecharczyk) leveraged technologyto develop a web based user interface that made finding, selecting, and booking travel easier. In the process, they also made it easy for homeowners to earn extra income, whether that be through renting a second home or simply listing a spare bedroom. In one decade, Airbnb transformed what it means to go on vacation. The homeshare juggernaut turns homeowners into hosts, guest rooms into cash cows, and overnight stays into dynamic encounters and lasting friendships. Its very name has become synonymous with finding unique short-term stays anywhere in theworld, enjoying great services and hospitality, and having amazing experiences. Airbnb is a noun, a verb, an adjective, and a movement — and the rest of the industry simply can’t keep up. But competition isn’t what defines this phenom of the sharing economy, community does. Its leaders blended innovative digital tools and a global village spirit to build unprecedented brand loyalty — at a time when most brands struggle to just stay visible.

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Working With Multiple Generations with Bob Fisch and Ed Fulbright on Mastering Your Money Radio

The words Millennial and Baby Boomers are seldom used in the same sentence. Even more rare, as a way to connect the two generations in a show of solidarity. Today we will discuss these two distinct generations to illustrate how they can learn valuable lessons from each other simply by listening more closely and sharing more freely. Baby Boomers are people born between 1946 to 1964 and Millennials between 1981 to 1996. No artificial barriers should divide the two generations. If we are to understand each other more fully, we should try to embody mutual values and best practices in how to create an ideal quality of life, how to face the future for mutual enrichment, and how to give back to each other and to society at large.

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Building Your Focus with Charlie Gilkey and Ed Fulbright on Mastering Your Money Radio Show

By any measure, we spend about half of our time thinking about something other than what we’re supposed to be doing. At work, this can be especially lethal to our projects and, along with them, our job satisfaction and success. Yet few people understand the degree to which routine diversions impact our performance. In fact, how many of us consider interruptions and distractions as just part of the job? But they aren’t, nor should they be, particularly when our precious projects are on the line. To start, let’s differentiate between interruptions, or externally driven diversions, and distractions, or internally driven diversions. Of the two, interruptions tend to be harder to deal with because they usually involve other living beings — say, a meddling micromanager, a chatty coworker, or even a playful pup. But distractions, particularly in the digital age, can be just as difficult. Who among us hasn’t allowed a ‘quick’ Facebook or email check devolve into 45 minutes we’ll never get back? Though minimizing distractions and interruptions may require different solutions, the solutions themselves share a common thread: They require recognizing the ‘entry point’ and then uncovering how to counter it. By focusing on entry points, we can actually prevent distractions and interruptions rather than just react to them. After all, once we’re diverted, we lose valuable momentum and oftentimes the will to recover it. So, whether interruptions or diversions, here are nine ways to deal with project diversions — and do your best work.

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Planning For Your Future with Mark C. Perna and Ed Fulbright on Mastering Your Money Radio

Society has done a huge disservice to young people by relying on outdated educational and workforce training models developed 50 years ago. Our one-size-fits-all approach that promotes college as the single path to a profitable, high-skilled profession is putting both the economy and an entire generation at risk. We face a national crisis of rising college costs, decreasing degree-requiring jobs and employer frustration with the younger generations in the workplace. Meanwhile, we’re pushing young people to obtain college degrees while simultaneously ignoring the importance of also acquiring valuable work skills. As a result, only 1 in 5 students feel prepared for today’s job market. We’re saddling them with enormous college debt for degrees that may not pay off.

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Creating Powerful Presentations with Norm Laviolette and Ed Fulbright On Mastering Your Money Radio

Developing a creation mindset, where you begin to see possibilities everywhere, is a learned skill. The chances of landing on a good idea are improved exponentially by incorporating a wide range of viewpoints. Applying techniques of improvisational comedy helps in proactively coming up with new ideas that can lead to innovation. Part of the joy of doing improve comes from the fact that, as a performer, you are allowed to follow wherever the scene goes without any real expectation to end up anywhere. The unknown, far from being scary, becomes limitless opportunity. The ability to build off of each other’s ideas invariably leads to unexpected places. It doesn’t matter if it’s a joke, a concept or a product, no idea is fully formed right out of the gate. The ability to build off of other’s ideas invariably leads to unexpected places. It enhances the process of going from starter concepts, to bigger and more expansive ideas — and, with some further assessment, editing and iteration, to full-blown realization and success.

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