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FULBRIGHT FINANCIAL CONSULTING, PA 

FULBRIGHT & FULBRIGHT, CPA, PA


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Working With Multiple Generations with Bob Fisch and Ed Fulbright on Mastering Your Money Radio

The words Millennial and Baby Boomers are seldom used in the same sentence. Even more rare, as a way to connect the two generations in a show of solidarity. Today we will discuss these two distinct generations to illustrate how they can learn valuable lessons from each other simply by listening more closely and sharing more freely. Baby Boomers are people born between 1946 to 1964 and Millennials between 1981 to 1996. No artificial barriers should divide the two generations. If we are to understand each other more fully, we should try to embody mutual values and best practices in how to create an ideal quality of life, how to face the future for mutual enrichment, and how to give back to each other and to society at large.

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Building Your Focus with Charlie Gilkey and Ed Fulbright on Mastering Your Money Radio Show

By any measure, we spend about half of our time thinking about something other than what we’re supposed to be doing. At work, this can be especially lethal to our projects and, along with them, our job satisfaction and success. Yet few people understand the degree to which routine diversions impact our performance. In fact, how many of us consider interruptions and distractions as just part of the job? But they aren’t, nor should they be, particularly when our precious projects are on the line. To start, let’s differentiate between interruptions, or externally driven diversions, and distractions, or internally driven diversions. Of the two, interruptions tend to be harder to deal with because they usually involve other living beings — say, a meddling micromanager, a chatty coworker, or even a playful pup. But distractions, particularly in the digital age, can be just as difficult. Who among us hasn’t allowed a ‘quick’ Facebook or email check devolve into 45 minutes we’ll never get back? Though minimizing distractions and interruptions may require different solutions, the solutions themselves share a common thread: They require recognizing the ‘entry point’ and then uncovering how to counter it. By focusing on entry points, we can actually prevent distractions and interruptions rather than just react to them. After all, once we’re diverted, we lose valuable momentum and oftentimes the will to recover it. So, whether interruptions or diversions, here are nine ways to deal with project diversions — and do your best work.

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Planning For Your Future with Mark C. Perna and Ed Fulbright on Mastering Your Money Radio

Society has done a huge disservice to young people by relying on outdated educational and workforce training models developed 50 years ago. Our one-size-fits-all approach that promotes college as the single path to a profitable, high-skilled profession is putting both the economy and an entire generation at risk. We face a national crisis of rising college costs, decreasing degree-requiring jobs and employer frustration with the younger generations in the workplace. Meanwhile, we’re pushing young people to obtain college degrees while simultaneously ignoring the importance of also acquiring valuable work skills. As a result, only 1 in 5 students feel prepared for today’s job market. We’re saddling them with enormous college debt for degrees that may not pay off.

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Creating Powerful Presentations with Norm Laviolette and Ed Fulbright On Mastering Your Money Radio

Developing a creation mindset, where you begin to see possibilities everywhere, is a learned skill. The chances of landing on a good idea are improved exponentially by incorporating a wide range of viewpoints. Applying techniques of improvisational comedy helps in proactively coming up with new ideas that can lead to innovation. Part of the joy of doing improve comes from the fact that, as a performer, you are allowed to follow wherever the scene goes without any real expectation to end up anywhere. The unknown, far from being scary, becomes limitless opportunity. The ability to build off of each other’s ideas invariably leads to unexpected places. It doesn’t matter if it’s a joke, a concept or a product, no idea is fully formed right out of the gate. The ability to build off of other’s ideas invariably leads to unexpected places. It enhances the process of going from starter concepts, to bigger and more expansive ideas — and, with some further assessment, editing and iteration, to full-blown realization and success.

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