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FULBRIGHT FINANCIAL CONSULTING, PA 

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Race and Money with Dr. Adia Harvey Wingfield and Ed Fulbright on Mastering Your Money Radio

What happens to black health care professionals in the new economy, where work is insecure and organizational resources are scarce? Today we will discuss how hospitals, clinics, and other institutions participate in “racial outsourcing,” relying heavily on black doctors, nurses, technicians, and physician assistants to do “equity work" extra labor that makes organizations and their services more accessible to communities of color. These organizations become more profit driven, they come to depend on black health care professionals to perform equity work to serve increasingly diverse constituencies. Yet black workers often do this labor without recognition, compensation, or support. Operating at the intersection of work, race, gender, and class, We will the challenges that black employees must overcome and reveals the complicated issues of inequality in today’s workplaces and communities. Joining us for our discussion on Race and Money is Adia Harvey Wingfield who is on the phone from her St. Louis Mo office. Adia Harvey Wingfield is a Professor of Sociology and a Faculty Fellow in the Office of the Provost. Adia’s research focuses on the processes that maintain racial and gender inequality in professional workplaces. She has lectured internationally on her research this area, and has published her work in numerous peer reviewed journals including Gender & Society, Social Problems, and American Behavioral Scientist. Adia is also the author of several books. In addition to serving as a Faculty Fellow, she is also President of Sociologists for Women in Society, a professional organization devoted to advancing gender equality in sociology. Her latest book is Flatlining: Race, Work, and Health Care in the New Economy Welcome to Mastering Your Money, Adia Harvey Wingfield .

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The Amazon Effect with Brian Dumaine and Ed Fulbright on Mastering Your Money Radio

Before the coronavirus epidemic, Amazon had been consuming some 2% of all U.S. household income, a percentage that has assuredly risen since the outbreak’s onset, particularly among the company’s more than 150+ million Amazon Prime members. While 51% of American households attend church, 62% have Prime memberships. In the best of times, the company’s presence in our daily lives is inescapable. As Amazon gains many invaluable lessons from the Covid-19 outbreak, the company will only become more ubiquitous in the decades ahead. Soberly aware of Amazon’s staying power, the CEO quipped to employees in 2018: “I predict one day, Amazon will fail. If you look at large companies, their lifespans tend to be thirty-plus years.” At the time he made that comment, Amazon was twenty-four-years-old. Bestselling Good to Great author Jim Collins says Amazon needs to build a new mechanism for growth. That mechanism—a virtuous cycle “flywheel” that used data to attract more buyers and sellers whose new data contributions could then be harnessed by the flywheel—was championed by Bezos and today has been made to accelerate even faster using Amazon’s massive AI engines. As the author argues, Amazon is a business where AI is increasingly making the decisions that humans used to make and keeps getting smarter on its own. Rivals have taken notice. This why some companies, such as Walmart and Alibaba, have chosen to steal from Amazon’s playbook while others have tried to identify the few things the Seattle juggernaut can’t do and excel at them. Bezos has built one of the most efficient wealth-creation machines in history, a juggernaut. This convenience, however, will come at a cost. It will lead to massive job disruptions and our lives being affected by technology in ever more invasive ways. Joining us for our discussion on The Amazon Effect is Brian Dumaine who is on the phone from his New York office. Brian Dumaine is an award-winning journalist and a contributing editor at Fortune magazine. His latest book is Bezonomics: How Amazon is Changing our Lives and What The World's Best Companies Are Learning From It. Welcome to Mastering Your Money, Brian Dumaine .

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A Great Jobs Surprise, But Stay Realistic By Fulbright Financial Consulting, PA

After suffering from the effects of the coronavirus pandemic for four months, the ailing U.S. economy was widely expected to suffer another loss of four and a quarter million jobs in May, but in a stunning surprise the economy instead created 2.5 million jobs! The news was a complete surprise and a major step toward a recovery, but the road back is still likely to take many months

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Sudden Career Change with Dr Jarret Patton and Ed Fulbright On Mastering Your Money Radio

What do you do when your life takes an unexpected turn for the worse? Where can you turn when everything you have worked for comes crashing down and your title no longer serves as your identity? You find your reputation that you have built over a couple decades being damage by false accusations by the legal and licensing systems. Joining us for our discussion Sudden Career Change is Dr. Jarret R. Patton who is calling in from his PA office. Jarret R. Patton better known as Dr. Jarret. He is a pediatrician with nearly 20 years of experience, spent his clinical career taking care of children in an urban clinic and his administrative career as a top physician executive in eastern Pennsylvania.

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Learning From Others With Joseph Michelli and Ed Fulbright On Mastering Your Money Radio

“With backgrounds in design thinking and software engineering, the founders of Airbnb (Brian Chesky, Joe Gebbia, and Nathan Blecharczyk) leveraged technologyto develop a web based user interface that made finding, selecting, and booking travel easier. In the process, they also made it easy for homeowners to earn extra income, whether that be through renting a second home or simply listing a spare bedroom. In one decade, Airbnb transformed what it means to go on vacation. The homeshare juggernaut turns homeowners into hosts, guest rooms into cash cows, and overnight stays into dynamic encounters and lasting friendships. Its very name has become synonymous with finding unique short-term stays anywhere in theworld, enjoying great services and hospitality, and having amazing experiences. Airbnb is a noun, a verb, an adjective, and a movement — and the rest of the industry simply can’t keep up. But competition isn’t what defines this phenom of the sharing economy, community does. Its leaders blended innovative digital tools and a global village spirit to build unprecedented brand loyalty — at a time when most brands struggle to just stay visible.

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