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FULBRIGHT FINANCIAL CONSULTING, PA 

FULBRIGHT & FULBRIGHT, CPA, PA


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Blueprints and Fingerprints with Ed Fulbright on Mastering Your Money Radio

Today we are going to talk about Blueprints and Fingerprints – How Your Past Experiences with Money Impact Your Financial Well-Being. Blueprints is how you think about money. Fingerprints is your attitude toward money. Much of what we form as money habits, our attitude toward financial issues and our patterns are started early in life by the examples we viewed and the personal decisions we made around money. We learned important lessons about money by the way we grew up. We addresses parent’s habits and perspectives around money and the impact of their parent’s perspectives as well. Our attitudes and habits toward saving, investing, debt, and giving are also formed and informed early in life. http://returnonlife.masteringyourmoney.com/ Joining us for this Blueprints and Fingerprints discussion is Markeith Gentry who is the WNCU’s Production Assistant and makes sure Mastering Your Money is available to our listeners. Welcome back to Mastering Your Money, Markeith Gentry

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Finding A Hobby In Retirement

Fulbright Financial Consulting, PA in Durham, NC, clients some times have a challenge finding a hobby especially in retirement. No one loves every single thing about their workday. But once you no longer need to worry about earning money, it is possible to love every second of your new retirement schedule. You just need to be intentional about spending your time doing things that interest you with the people you care about the most.

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What Is Your Charitable Philosophy with Kris Putnam-Walkerly and Ed Fulbright on Mastering Your Money Radio

We’re all trying to slow the spread of SARS-CoV-2 and protect those at risk and philanthropists are in a unique position to help — but only if they have the ability to mobilize quickly, appropriately and effectively. If this global pandemic is teaching us anything, it’s that we can be responsive and flexible in the face of adversity—at a massive scale. Regardless of a philanthropist's focus, there are effective ways to soften the curve of crisis for grantees working to advance change. Now, the best known philanthropist are usually billionaires because their gifts have a lot of zeros. Robert F. Smith who paid off all the student loans of the graduating from Morehouse College, Warren Buffett who is giving away his fortune to the Gates Foundation and John Rockfeller whose foundation is about the well being of humanity in the world. The definition of philanthropist is to love humanity. Today, philanthropy means generosity in all forms. It is often defined as giving gifts of the 3 Ts (time, talent and treasure) to help make life better for other people. You do not have to be a millionaire or billionaire to be philanthropist. You can practice philanthropy by making a monetary gift, such as a donation to a cause you believe in.

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Working With Multiple Generations with Bob Fisch and Ed Fulbright on Mastering Your Money Radio

The words Millennial and Baby Boomers are seldom used in the same sentence. Even more rare, as a way to connect the two generations in a show of solidarity. Today we will discuss these two distinct generations to illustrate how they can learn valuable lessons from each other simply by listening more closely and sharing more freely. Baby Boomers are people born between 1946 to 1964 and Millennials between 1981 to 1996. No artificial barriers should divide the two generations. If we are to understand each other more fully, we should try to embody mutual values and best practices in how to create an ideal quality of life, how to face the future for mutual enrichment, and how to give back to each other and to society at large.

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Europe's Growth Problem and Your Portfolio By Fulbright Financial Consulting, PA

Aging populations are reshaping the world’s largest economies; it’s caused a global savings glut and is driving current U.S. financial economic conditions. The demographic trends are behind the U.S. yield curve inversion and stock market volatility, but rarely make headlines in the financial press. Here are the facts. Germany’s working age population is shrinking, as is all of Europe’s, Japan’s and China’s, too. In contrast, the U.S. working age population is expected to grow in the years ahead. With the world’s largest economies home to a growing population of retirees, demand for secure retirement income is driving prices for sovereign bonds higher. The glut of savings from income-starved retirees is chasing the certainty of government guaranteed bonds, driving prices higher and yields down. Exacerbating the bond market problem, Germany, the world’s second largest supplier of sovereign bonds after the U.S., has been issuing fewer bonds to avoid burdening its growing population of retirees with paying down government debt. Shrinking the supply adds to the upward pressure on sovereign debt prices and depresses yields. In addition, rising likelihood of a recession in Germany, has forced its central bank to keep interest rates low to stimulate growth. This confluence of the demographic and economic slowdown has boosted demand for U.S. Treasury bonds, driving prices on long-term bonds higher and yields lower. With the yield on a three-month T-bill at 1.99% higher than the yield on a 10-year Treasury bond, at 1.5%, the yield curve is inverted — as it has been for much of 2019. For the past several decades, yield curve inversions were rare and usually were followed within 18 months by a recession. So the current inversion has spread fears of a U.S. recession and caused increased volatility in the stock market in recent months. Retirement income investors may want to consider how lower yields on fixed income allocations in their portfolios might affect them in the years ahead, because the change in supply and demand for sovereign debt is being driven by long term demographics. Significantly, the yield curve inversion is caused by bond market supply and demand and not U.S. economic fundamentals. The baby-boom spawned an “echo” baby-boom generation and that makes the growth path of the U.S. comparatively favorable to the other major world economies. Please contact us with any questions or to set up a meeting, and don't hesitate to share this video with people who might benefit from my work.

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